We Took a Dive Into Six TikTok Marketing Fears

We Took a Dive Into Six TikTok Marketing Fears

marketing
social-media
tiktok

The average user spends 52 minutes a day on TikTok. In that time, they could consume 52 60-second videos, or 208 15-second videos. That's a lot of opportunities to get your message in front of users.

Feb 12 4 minute read

Only 4% of marketers are using TikTok as a part of their company’s social strategy, despite it being the biggest emerging social platform.

So why are they so hesitant to jump on the bandwagon?

1. The platform doesn’t care if you look good

Unlike Instagram, TikTok users generally place very little value on how aesthetically pleasing content is.

This is, in part, due to the nature of the content that people can post.

Videos can be a maximum of 15 seconds long, you can stitch them together to create one 60 second long video, and they need to be full screen and vertical. 

The easiest way to do that? Shoot it on the mobile phone in your pocket. 

The quality is lower, but the footage is more authentic. That’s what the users value.

What does this mean for marketers?

Say goodbye to beautifully curated Instagram grids and colour schemes. Embrace lo-fi video footage.

2. Memes upon memes upon memes...

The many layers of irony and shape-shifting memes that swiftly become parodies of themselves make the platform hard to understand unless you’re really ingrained in the content every day.

The average user spends 52 minutes a day on TikTok. In that time, they could consume 52 60-second videos, or 208 15-second videos.

That’s a lot of content, and a lot of potential for in-jokes to snowball within the TikTok using community and become incomprehensible to anyone from the outside.

What does this mean for marketers?

You’re going to need to become a TikTok native. Get yourself on the platform, see how people are using it, get a feel for the tone of the jokes (spoiler alert, the tone is “absurdist”) and tap into the rich seam of jokes.

3. Little control over your brand’s message

Due to the viral nature of TikTok, and the way that the app is built around the concept of seeing someone post a video to a soundtrack, ripping that soundtrack and creating your own video, brand no longer have control over the way people use their name, music, content or products.

What does this mean for marketers?

Get on board with the idea of relinquishing control of whatever you create. It might even be a huge compliment!

4. A young user base

60% of the app’s monthly active users are 16 to 24. They don’t have much spending power (or pocket money), so what’s the point of getting their attention on TikTok?

Because almost all of the biggest social platforms started with a really young user base, then attracted older people with more spending money further down the line.

What does this mean for marketers?

If you get in on the ground floor now, you’ll have a great back catalogue of experiments you’ve tried, and a really good feel for the app by the time the 25-35 age brackets really embraces TikTok.

5. Confusing advertising opportunities

TikTok doesn’t just let anyone advertise on their platform. You have to ask to make an advertising account and be approved, and once you’re in the opportunities are still limited compared to the powerhouse of Facebook advertising.

Ads that are run show up in-feed with all the rest of the user-generated content, or as a takeover when people open the app, or through sponsored hashtags and in-app shopping experiences.

What does this mean for marketers?

TikTok is still experimenting with advertising formats, and it’s really hard to tell what works and what doesn’t. Work on the native content for now and wait to see what tools will come next.

6. To make it work, you’ve got to make smart content

Unlike Instagram, people spend most of their time on TikTok scrolling through an AI-powered feed called the “For You” page. This isn’t filled with content from people that users follow (that’s in another, less-frequented tab) but is instead filled with content that it thinks you’ll like.

For content to land on the For You page, it’s got to resonate with your exact target audience. You can’t create average content and expect it to get a lot of likes and reach just because your fans are loyal to you. 

What does this mean for marketers?

You have to produce content with inherent, stand-alone value. Nobody’s going to come to a brand profile and have a scroll through (except me, when I was writing this article). Create content for the For You page, and really put yourself into the shoes of someone who’s stuck in an endless scroll. What would they like to see?

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